Saturday, March 9, 2013

The Mostly True Adventures of Homer P. Figg by Rodman Philbrick Journal Entry

Dear Mr. W,

I just started reading The Mostly True Adventures of Homer P. Figg and already I have been able to make some inferences. I know plenty about two characters, Stink and Smelt, from their words and actions, things the author hasn't told readers.

They are criminals. They have a man tied up by the wrists and ankles and have a sack over his head. They kicked him when he made noise. Smelt says, “You stay quiet as a mouse, maybe you’ll live to see the sun come up. Which is any minute now.” These are not the actions of a law-abiding citizen. They also are stealing Homer’s horse, which he stole. (Even though it is rightfully his.)

I think they must be wanted by the law because when they first find Homer, they ask if he was sent by the judge. Why else would a judge want two guys who are hiding in the woods who happen to have a man tied up? Criminals.

You could call them gamblers because they take risks. Releasing Homer is a risk because he’s a liar and might not go along with Stink and Smelt's plan. Forging official documents is against the law, but they will try it anyway. Money is more important to them than people, safety, the truth, and the law.

Today I read about when Homer met Mr. Brewster. Mr. Brewster tells Homer all about Stink and Smelt. He knows their full names and all about their evil deeds. He also knows that they are in the woods, that they have kidnapped Samuel Reed, and are right now watching him and Homer walk in the mine. This tells me that Stink and Smelt aren’t very good at what they do. They might have successfully caught and sold runaway slaves, but their inability to keep it secret will probably get them caught sooner than later. Stink and Smelt can’t be very sneaky if Mr. Brewster already knows all this information about them.

Sincerely,
Brian Fifth Grader

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